Ontario Movers

Professional & Affordable Movers Specializing in Local Moving, Long Distance Moving & Commercial Moving, Piano Moving Services in Ontario.

Green Movers is a full service Ontario moving and storage company. Green Movers company is the most experienced and respected Movers in Great Ontario Area, Ontario-wide movers, and we are known for unsurpassed customer service and our impeccable attention to details. At Ontario Movers Green Movers we put you, the customer, first. Ontario Movers Ontario Moving Company Best House, Office, Condo, Apartment Moving Services.

Professional & Affordable Movers Specializing in Local Moving, Long Distance Moving & Commercial Moving, Piano Moving Services in Ontario. We operate 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. This gives you the flexibility to move when it is most convenient for you. It is ideal to plan your move in advance, but we are equipped to accommodate unexpected, last minute moves just as easily.

Professional Ontario Movers for less! You can call us one of our professional Ontario Moving Consultants 24hrs a day, 7 days a week at.

Tel: (647) 225-6144
Free toll:+1(647) 225-6144
Email: info@greenmovers.ca

 

Now little about your lovely, Ontario.

This information is provided by http://en.wikipedia.org

Ontario, the province that one in three Canadians calls home. Ontario is a magnet for industry, the arts and science. The population is made up of many cultural backgrounds drawn to this vibrant province. Ontario is a study in contrasts. The varied landscape includes the vast, rocky and mineral-rich Canadian Shield, which separates the fertile farmland in the south and the grassy lowlands of the north. There are over 250,000 lakes in Ontario -- they make up about one-third of the world's fresh water. In summer, temperatures can soar above 30 (86F), while in winter they can drop to below -40C (-40F). Ontario's industries range from cultivating crops, to mining minerals, to manufacturing automobiles, to designing software and leading-edge technology. Cultures from around the world thrive and are celebrated in Ontario with festivals such as Caribana (West Indian), Oktoberfest (German) and the Canadian Aboriginal Festival.

Travellers can enjoy the many experiences Ontario has to offer, from a wilderness expedition in the north, to a "shop till you drop into your theatre seat" city excursion. Take a virtual tour of Ontario and learn about the people, the places and the events that give Ontario its vitality. Start your tour by selecting the subjects that interest you in the column on the left. Even people who live in Ontario can have trouble appreciating the sheer size of this province. Ontario is Canada's second largest province, covering more than one million square kilometres (415,000 square miles) - an area larger than France and Spain combined. If you look at a map of Ontario you will notice that the province is bounded by Quebec on the east, Manitoba on the west, Hudson Bay and James Bay on the north, and the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes on the south. The longest east-west distance in Ontario is 1,690 kilometres (1050 miles). The longest north-south distance is 1,730 kilometres (1075 miles).

The highest point is 693 metres (785 yards) above sea level, in the Timiskaming area. Manitoulin Island in Georgian Bay is the world's largest freshwater island covering 2,766 square kilometres (1,068 square miles). Sault Ste. Marie is the Ontario city located closest to the halfway point of the Trans-Canada Highway that runs from Victoria, British Columbia to St. Johns, Newfoundland. Ontario is home to more than one time zone. The boundary line between the Central Time Zone and Eastern Time Zone is just west of Thunder Bay running north from the United States border to Hudson Bay. Ontario's most northerly communities are close to the same latitude as London, England and Warsaw, Poland. Ontario's southernmost point of land is Middle Island, in Lake Erie south of Point Pelee, roughly parallel to Barcelona, Spain or Rome, Italy. More than 13 million people live in Ontario. The Canadian Shield (pictured in shades of red) is Canada's largest physiographic area as it can be found in at least six provinces (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec plus Newfoundland and Labrador) and two territories (Northwest and Nunavut).

It covers about two-thirds of Ontario and contains Precambrian rocks that are more than 570 million years old. The rocks are exposed or are covered by soils, peat, sand, gravel, clay and debris from the glacial activity in the past. Glacial features found in the Shield include outwash, eskers, moraine, kames, whalebacks and drumlins. Glacial activity helped to form the basins and paths for the many pictureque lakes, rivers and streams on the Shield that vacationers are attracted to. The cottages, resorts and waterways have inspired writers and painters to produce some very creative works to assist with the tourism industry. In Ontario the area within the Canadian Shield also provides vast forest regions for the lumber industry and historically it has also provided areas that are ideal for trapping and hunting to the benefit of the fur trade in Ontario. Today it also provides the mining industry with resources for amethyst, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, nickel, platinum, silver, zinc and many other minerals. In Ontario the Canadian Shield extends from the Manitoba border in a wide swath through the province to the Thousand Islands area of the St. Lawrence River just east of Kingston, then north to just west of Ottawa and on to Quebec. The Ishpatina Ridge is the highest point in Ontario at 693 metres. Artifacts and archaeological excavation that show human habitation of what is today Ontario date back at least 7,000 years. Many distinct native cultures and languages flourished. In the north, Algonquin, Cree and Ojibwa people fished and hunted. The first farmers in the south were the Huron, Tobacco (Petun), Neutrals (Attiwandaron), and Iroquois. The Iroquois Five Nations included the Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida and Mohawk.

The Tuscarora joined the Five Nations in 1722 and henceforth they were known as the Six Nations. The Iroquois lived mostly in northern New York State until after the American Revolution when many of them moved to Ontario as Loyalists. Distinct native cultures and languages have continued and evolve to this day. The first Europeans to visit Ontario arrived by boat. French explorers Etienne Brul and Samuel de Champlain followed the St. Lawrence River into Lake Ontario in 1610 and 1615, respectively. Henry Hudson sailed into Ontario from the north and claimed the Hudson Bay area for Britain in 1611. Both the French and the British were keenly interested in Ontarios commercial possibilities particularly the fur trade. Both built fortifications to protect their interests. The first settlers set up their base in the south, where the climate and land supported farming and the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence offered a natural transportation route. The French and British were rivals in the New World as well as in the Old World and fought each other in North America intermittently beginning in the early 1600's. The final war for what is now Canada fought between the French and British (the Seven Years War) began in 1754. When it ended with the Treaty of Paris in 1763, France ceded its claims for this land to Great Britain. British settlement was bolstered by the American Revolution which began in 1775. The revolutionary war ended in 1783, but colonists there who wanted to remain loyal to Britain (United Empire Loyalists) flocked to Ontario. With a population of more than 13 million, Ontario is home to about one in three Canadians. More than 85 per cent live in urban centres, largely in cities on the shores of the Great Lakes.

The largest concentration of people and cities is in the "Golden Horseshoe" along the western end of Lake Ontario including the Greater Toronto Area, Hamilton, St. Catharines and Niagara Falls. The Greater Golden Hoseshoe describes the metropolitan area outside the core region and one of the fastest growing areas in North America. The wider region spreads inland in all directions away from the Lake Ontario shoreline, southwest to Brantford, west to the Kitchener-Waterloo area, north to Barrie, and northeast to Peterborough. Over eight million people live in the "Greater Golden Horseshoe". In southwestern Ontario, significant populations live in London, Kincardine and Windsor. In eastern Ontario, Ottawa and Kingston are the predominant cities. In northern Ontario, smaller municipalities have evolved at strategic points along the original railway lines that opened up the wilderness to mining and logging. The cities that have evolved include Hearst, Moosonee, Kenora, Sudbury, North Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Thunder Bay and Timmins. Detailed information about these urban centres can be accessed from the Cities and Towns page.

This information is provided by http://en.wikipedia.org

Contact

Green Movers
Free toll:+1(647) 225-6144
Tel: (647) 225-6144
Email: info@greenmovers.ca

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional



Feel out the form below and get free quotes:

*

*

*


*

Moving From: Moving To:

*

*

*

Estimated Move Weight (Approximate): Moving Date:
* *