Kitchener Movers

 

Professional & Affordable Movers Specializing in Local Moving,Long Distance Moving & Commercial Moving,Piano Moving Services in Kitchener.

Green Movers is a full service Kitchener moving and storage company. Green Movers company is the most experienced and respected Movers in Great Kitchener Area, Ontario-wide movers, and we are known for unsurpassed customer service and our impeccable attention to details. At Kitchener Movers Green Movers we put you,the customer, first.

Kitchener Movers, Kitchener Moving Company, Best House, Office, Condo, Apartment Moving Services. Professional & Affordable Movers Specializing in Local Moving, Long Distance Moving & Commercial Moving, Piano Moving Services in Kitchener .

We operate 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. This gives you the flexibility to move when it is most convenient for you. It is ideal to plan your move in advance, but we are equipped to accommodate unexpected, last minute moves just as easily.

Professional Kitchener Movers for less! You can call us one of our professional Kitchener Moving Consultants 24hrs a day, 7 days a week at

Tel: (647) 225-6144
Free toll:+1(647) 225-6144
Email: info@greenmovers.ca

Now little about your lovely city Kitchener,Ontario.

This information is provided by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchener,_Ontario

The City of Kitchener is a city in Southern Ontario, Canada. It was the Town of Berlin from 1854 until 1912 and the City of Berlin from 1912 until 1916. The city had a population of 204,668 in the Canada 2006 Census. The metropolitan area, which includes the neighbouring cities of Waterloo and Cambridge, has 451,235 people, making it the eleventh largest Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) in Canada and the fifth largest CMA in Ontario.It is the seat of the Waterloo Regional Municipality, and is adjacent to the smaller cities of Cambridge to the south, and Waterloo to the north. Kitchener and Waterloo are often referred to jointly as "Kitchener-Waterloo" (K-W), although they have separate municipal governments. Including Cambridge, the three cities are known as "the tri-cities".

The City of Kitchener covers an area of 136.86 square kilometres. In 1784, the land that Kitchener was built upon was an area given to the Six Nations by the British as a gift for their allegiance during the American Revolution; 240,000 hectares of land to be exact. From 1796 and 1798, the Six Nations sold 38,000 hectares of this land to a Loyalist by the name of Colonel Richard Beasley. The portion of land that Beasley had purchased was remote but it was of great interest to German Mennonite farming families from Pennsylvania. They wanted to live in an area that would allow them to practice their beliefs without persecution. Eventually, the Mennonites purchased all of Beasley's unsold land creating 160 farm tracts. By 1800, the first buildings were built,and over the next decade several families made the difficult trip north to what was then known as the Sand Hills. One of these Mennonite families, arriving in 1807, was the Schneiders, whose restored 1816 home (the oldest building in the city) is now a museum located in the heart of Kitchener.Other families whose names can still be found in local place names were the Bechtels, the Ebys, the Erbs, the Weavers (better known today as the Webers) the Cressmans and the Brubachers. In 1816 the Government of Upper Canada designated the settlement the Township of Waterloo. Much of the land, made up of moraines and swampland interspersed with rivers and streams, was converted to farmland and roads. Wild pigeons, which once swarmed by the tens of thousands, were driven from the area. Apple trees were introduced to the region by John Eby in the 1830s, and several grist- and sawmills (most notably Joseph Schneider's 1816 sawmill, John and Abraham Erb's grist- and sawmills and Eby's cider mill) were erected throughout the area. Schneider built the town's first road, from his home to the corner of King Street and Queen Street (then known as Walper corner).

$1000 was raised by the settlers to extend the road from Walper corner to Huether corner, where the Huether Brewery was built and the Huether Hotel now stands; a petition to the government for $100 to assist in completing the project was denied. Immigration to the town increased considerably from 1816 until the 1870s, many of the newcomers being of German (particularly Mennonite) extraction. In 1833 the town was renamed Berlin, and in 1853 Berlin became the County Seat of the newly created County of Waterloo, elevating it to the status of Village. The extension of the Grand Trunk Railway from Sarnia to Toronto (and hence through Berlin) in July 1856 was a major boon to the community, helping to improve industrialization in the area. On June 9, 1912, Berlin was officially designated a city. However, with the outbreak of the First World War in 1914 came anti-German sentiment and an internal conflict ensued as the city was forced to confront its cultural distinctiveness. There was pressure for the city to change its name from Berlin, and in 1916 following much debate and controversy, the name of the city was changed to Kitchener; named after Field Marshal The 1st Earl Kitchener, who died that year, while serving as the Secretary of State for War in the United Kingdom. On September 17, 1981, the first ever "blue box" recycling program was launched in Kitchener.

Today, more than 90% of Ontario households have access to recycling programs and annually they divert more than 650,000 tonnes of secondary resource materials. The blue box program has expanded in various forms throughout Canada and to countries around the world such as the United States, United Kingdom, France and Australia, serving more than 40 million households around the world. The closest airport to Kitchener is the Region of Waterloo International Airport in nearby Breslau, but while it is a thriving general-aviation field, it is not heavily served by scheduled airlines. Most air travellers use Toronto's Lester B. Pearson International Airport or John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport. WestJet has scheduled daily non-stop service to Calgary from Waterloo International Airport using Boeing 737-700 aircraft.

They started service out of Waterloo International Airport on May 14, 2007 for the summer season and then decided to fly year-round due to strong passenger demand. As of June 27, 2010 Westjet also flies non-stop daily from Waterloo International Airport to Vancouver. Bearskin Airlines started offering service in the fall of 2007 with three flights daily between Kitchener and Ottawa using a Fairchild Turboprop aircraft. Strong demand has resulted in Bearskin Airlines adding a fourth flight on Fridays. During the winter months Sunwing Airlines offers service to Dominican Republic. Recent upgrades to the runways, approach lighting and terminal building have permitted larger aircraft to use this airport. Air Canada has been in talks with the Region with an eye on starting flights to Montreal and Porter Airlines has been discussing offering flights to Toronto Island.

This information is provided by http://en.wikipedia.org !

Contact

Green Movers
131 Waterloo Ave,

Toronto, ON
M3H 3Y7
Tel: (647) 225-6144
Email: info@greenmovers.ca

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