Burlington Movers

 

Professional & Affordable Movers Specializing in Local Moving, Long Distance Moving & Commercial Moving, Piano Moving Services in Burlington.  

 

Green Movers is a full service Burlington moving and storage company. Green Movers company is the most experienced and respected Movers in Great Burlington Area, Ontario-wide movers, and we are known for unsurpassed customer service and our impeccable attention to details. At Burlington Movers Green Movers we put you, the customer, first.

Burlington Movers, Burlington Moving Company, Best House, Office, Condo, Apartment Moving Services. Professional & Affordable Movers Specializing in Local Moving, Long Distance Moving & Commercial Moving, Piano Moving Services in Burlington.

We operate 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. This gives you the flexibility to move when it is most convenient for you. It is ideal to plan your move in advance, but we are equipped to accommodate unexpected, last minute moves just as easily.

Professional Burlington Movers for less! You can call us one of our professional Burlington Moving Consultants 24hrs a day,7 days a week at

Tel: (647) 225-6144
Free toll:+1(647) 225-6144
Email: info@greenmovers.ca

 

Now little about your lovely city Burlington,Ontario.

This information is provided by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burlington,_Ontario

Burlington (Canada 2006 Census population 164,415) is a city located in the Greater Toronto Area at the western end of Lake Ontario. The city lies between the north shore of Lake Ontario and the ridge of the Niagara Escarpment. Politically, the city is part of Halton Region. Physically, Burlington is roughly in the centre of the Golden Horseshoe region, a dynamic location in Southern Ontario with many attractions. The city has been rated as one of Canada's best places to live, presently ranking as the nation's third best city in which to reside. Some of the city's attractions include Canada's Largest Ribfest, Sound of Music Festival, Burlington Art Centre, and Spencer Smith Park, all located centrally in close proximity to the Waterfront at Downtown Burlington.

The city is a great location for nature lovers as it shares the Royal Botanical Gardens with Hamilton, and has both the Niagara Escarpment (a key world biosphere) and the Iroquoian section of the Bruce Trail in the north end of the city. Before pioneer settlement in the 19th century, the area was covered by the primeval forest that stretched between the provincial capital of York and the town of Hamilton, and was home to various First Nations peoples. In 1792, John Graves Simcoe, the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada, named the western end of Lake Ontario "Burlington Bay" after the town of Bridlington in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England.By the time land beside the bay was deeded to Captain Joseph Brant at the turn of the nineteenth century, the name "Burlington" was already in common use. With the completion of the local survey after the War of 1812, the land was opened for settlement. The sandy, well-drained soil and amenable climate encouraged farming, and the area rapidly became the bread-basket of the region, known for wheat production.

Produce from the farms was shipped out via the bustling docks of the lakeside villages of Port Nelson and Wellington Square, as well as Brown's Wharf in the nearby village of Port Flamborough (which was to become Aldershot). Lumber taken from the surrounding forests also competed for space on the busy docks. However, in the latter half of the 19th century, increased wheat production from Western Canada convinced local farmers to switch to fruit and vegetable production. In 1874, Wellington Square and Port Nelson were incorporated into the Village of Burlington. However, the arrival of large steamships on the Great Lakes made the small docks of the local ports obsolete, and the increased use of railways to ship goods marked the end of the commercial wharves. Farming still thrived though, and the resultant growth resulted in continued prosperity. By 1906, the town boasted both its own newspaper the Burlington Gazette--as well as a town library and a local rail line that connected Burlington to nearby Hamilton. During the First World War, 300 local men volunteered for duty in the Canadian Expeditionary Force--38 did not return.

In 1915, Burlington was incorporated into a town. Following the Second World War, cheap electricity from nearby Niagara Falls and better transportation access due to the new (1939)Queen Elizabeth Way encouraged both light industry and families to move to Burlington. The population sky-rocketed as new homes were built, encouraging developers to build even more new homes. In 1962, Burlington annexed most of the Township of Nelson, as well as Aldershot, formerly a part of East Flamborough Township. By 1967, the last cash crop farm within the city had been replaced by the Burlington Mall. By 1974, with a population exceeding 100,000, Burlington was incorporated as a city. The extremely high rate of growth continued, and between 2001 and 2006, the population of Burlington grew by 9%, compared to Canada's overall growth rate of 5.4%. By 2006, the population topped 160,000. Continued high rates of growth are forecast as farmland north of Dundas Street (former Highway 5) and south of Highway #407 is developed into more suburban housing.

This information is provided by http://en.wikipedia.org

 

Contact

Green Movers
131 Waterloo Ave,

Toronto, ON
M3H 3Y7
Tel: (647) 225-6144
Email: info@greenmovers.ca



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